Skip to main content

tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 11, 2012 3:00am-6:00am PDT

3:00 am
we have a jerry. he writes "senior citizen, new glasses. got up to watch willie. he looks great. so young." >> look at this skin. vibrant and fresh. >> very good. we've e-mail matt, in boulder, coloradop. can't sleep now that i'm picturing what it would have been like to see dick cheney run at kids with a super soaker. >> i don't think vice president cheney has any super soakers, that would have been a funny thing. look at biden. fits in. almost like clark grisswald, joe biden filling the road. nice photography by jonathan capeheart. "morning joe" starts right now. let's throw it away to joe scarborough. god bless. there's been tremendous turmoil in our financial markets and wall street and it is -- it's -- people are frightened by these events. our economy, i think, still, the
3:01 am
fundamentals of our economy are strong. >> the truth of the matter is that, as i said, we've created 4.3 million jobs over the last two -- 27 months. over 800,000 just this year alone. the private sector is doing fine. ♪ >> our economy, i think, still, the fundamentals of our economy are strong. the fend mnl fundamentals of o are strong. the fundamentals of our economy are strong. strong, strong. >> i'm barack obama, i approve this message. ♪
3:02 am
>> now the private sector is doing fine. now the private sector is doing fine. >> good morning. it's monday, june 11th, with us on set msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin. also former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst steve rattner, we also have form communications director for president george w. bush and former senior adviser, mccain campaign nicolle wallace, nicole's novel "it's classified" is out in paperback now. yes, i don't think the publishing industry will ever be the same. this changes everything. >> paperback, e-book, still find
3:03 am
the hard copies if you look hard enough. >> all right, nicole. >> library. >> you've been there, nicole. you were the one in charge of trying to tamp down all the screaming when john mccain went out there as the economy was collapsing, saying the fundamentals of the economy are strong. when i first heard the clip this weekend of the president, i just gasped. >> i did too. >> took me straight back to september 15th, 2008. what makes politicians say such things? >> well, the truth is, they are out of touch because of the nature of the jobs that they have, and i think that this moment reminded me more of john kerry's gaffe when he actually said, i voted for it before i voted against it, in 2004. they were talking about funding for the troops. i think this is one of those things where it doesn't matter what the romney campaign does with it. some people will see that ad, some won't. it doesn't matter what obama does to clean it up.
3:04 am
>> try to explain it. >> he went out with a foreign leader and tried to clean it up a few hours later. it's one of the moments that has no ability to be shaped or spun or distilled or explained away by the other. it leaves an impression that cements into the minds of certainly everyone on the right, and far too many in the middle for the obama campaign, liking -- >> too many people looking for work. >> correct. >> it seals in this narrative he has no clue when it comes to creating jobs in the private sector. >> mark halperin, when you looked at that clip, you knew immediately they would have to try to clean up. that's a devastating clip, again, because of the way he delivered it, he wasn't reading off notes, he believed it. he believed the private sector is doing fine. >> i have a minority view on this. i think this is silgly. i thought when john mccain said the fundamentals of the economy are strong is silly. >> silly in the way that changed the direction of the economy. >> the press and political
3:05 am
opponents jump all over it. john mccain was making a point perfectly valid and so was the president. i think this is what our politics has become. it's hard for me to swim upstream against it because everything nicole said is right in terms of what is, but it isn't what ought to be. >> look at the polls, pre-september 15th. before john mccain said what he said, john mccain and sarah palin were on a march. they were ahead of barack obama. they were doing very well. that was a -- nicole, you were -- >> yeah. >> it's true it has that effect. i'm saying it shouldn't. >> guess what? dan delions shouldn't be under snow in january but they are. you were there. you were inside. when he said that, not only was there an internal crisis, but the polls immediately showed, collapse, didn't they? because the guy looked clueless! >> he was cemented into people's mind this feel he was feeling his way around the financial
3:06 am
crisis with as much consternation and confusion as they were and that's not what people want. people want someone who can come into office and fix things. they want someone who knows more about the problems that alarm and frighten them than they do and the problem with obama, obama's comment, is that people already suspected he didn't understand the problems and the strain on families when the private sector doesn't thrive. he is so demonized the private sector that he almost can't dig himself out of that. >> i think that's -- >> of course he understands. >> hold on a second. you think he understands the private sector? you need to talk to people who run the private sector and i guarantee you, 99 out of 100 you talk to that run the private sector don't think he understands the private sector and how to run it and what makes it effective. >> that's not what nicole said. asked whether he understood the struggles people are having in the current economy. >> and the connection to the private sector. >> let's talk about the difference between the private and public sector. a long belief by business people
3:07 am
that this president is obsessive over public sector jobs, but he doesn't really know -- >> obsessive over public sector jobs? >> public sector jobs, but he doesn't really understand how the private sector works? you've heard that, right? >> sure i've heard that, of course i've heard that, and many businessmen say that. the question whether he understands how the private sector works or not is a legitimate question. i don't think it's the question we're talking about this morning. we're talking about this morning about political statements that might seem ininopportune. when john mccain said that, it was immediately followed by one of the greatest collapses of financial history and one of the greatest drops in job decline in history. when the president said it -- i don't know if it was a slip of the tongue, or if he generally believes the private sector is fine. remember the administration is emphasizing there have been over 4.4 million private sector jobs created since the bottom of the jobs recession. as we're going to see on our charts later, corporate sector profits are doing just fine.
3:08 am
i don't know which of those pieces he got mixed up in his own mind, but -- and i'm not here to debate whether he understands the private sector but i think he certainly understands there's still almost 5 million americans who had work when this recession began who don't have work now. >> let me ask you this. do you think the private sector is doing fine? >> it depends what you mean by doing fine? the private sector profits are doing better than fine, at record levels. they went through a recession but they've soared back. >> those are those rich people the president doesn't like. >> well, you said to me is the private sector doing fine. i'm parsing it for you. >> but -- >> jobs -- >> the private sector the president is talking about. if you told him that the corporations were making lots of money, that would not be doing fine by this president's definition. >> if you look at it in terms of jobs, since the beginning of the recession, there have been close to 5 million jobs lost in the prior to sector. so i think you have a hard time saying the private sector is doing fine. and by the way, people always talk about jobs and i just -- as
3:09 am
i like to remind them there's always incomes and people's incomes are down in the private sector over this period of time. so even the 90% of americans who have jobs, have lower incomes on average. >> okay. that's not -- that -- that wouldn't be like -- >> fine. >> it's not super fine. >> i'm saying it's not fine. >> nicole, i want to go back to you. there are -- there are moments throughout history where a president will say something on air that will be so wildly out of touch, that people will just pull their hair out. the first thing i can remembers is watching gerald ford in the 1976 debate with jimmy carter and here i was, '76, i was 13 years old, and i heard gerald ford say there was no soviet influence in poland and, you know, i put down my nerf darts and said no! and then he was given the opportunity to clean it up again. like no!
3:10 am
i was throwing my records against the wall. it was so blatantly obvious. and then the president saying that the private sector is fine. but this happens from time to time. like, what was the key when george w. bush would say something like this or you worked for john mccain, like what's the key for this white house? what does this white house need to do? >> it's always a reminder for the president of the power and magnification of the office of the presidency. george w. bush spent his entire presidency, i think you can look at it before and after the speech where he stood in front of a banner that said "mission accomplished." there are things you can say and images you can present that are indelible, that's either cement in the mind a narrative that people had already been worried about or that are such big blunders. i would put obama's comment in the blunder category that you don't recover from them, you simply have to move on. i think this is one that the
3:11 am
obama campaign will move on from, as mark said, the media cycle is so accelerated, there's so much gunk in the system now, there will be a gazillion more stories between now and election day they'll have to deal with. this is devastating in that it suggests not that he thinks the private sector is doing fine, but that he doesn't understand that the health of the private sector is tied to the economic pain that many american families feel. he sees the private sector in a box, says those people are doing fine over there, and he doesn't worry about them. what i think the debate will be in this election, is that the health, the prosperity, the ability to flourish in the private sector is directly linked to our ability to add jobs, to the income of middle-class families to the way people feel about this economy. we have a president who is not only rooting against the private sector, but doesn't seem to understand the connection. >> i would not, myself, go that far. i have a more benign explanation. i think as i said, that he's
3:12 am
looked at some jobs numbers show it getting better. i think he misspoke, and corrected himself, unlike gerald ford in that debate and i agree with mark, this will be a movement and we move. i don't think this will be a defining moment of the campaign. this is going to be one of those bad choice of words that he will, and i think to a great [ inaudible ] get done with this program, will get past. >> the president says this, we have to fight back, find a way to change the story. so the president comes out. in addition, governor romney later in the day said something about how we don't need more teachers and firefighters and police, and rather than sort of calling a truce and saying, oh, well, people say things they shouldn't say, the president did this morning now governor romney has, they jumped on that and tried to make a huge deal of that. these are two serious guys running for president and the dynamics of friday and into the weekend and into this morning is, this is a campaign about twitter and web videos. >> one difference, mark.
3:13 am
governor romney has endorsed a budget that would, in fact, have fewer teachers and firefighters and policemen. that is his policy. that is what he is saying he's going to do. >> right. and that's a position that many people in the country think is the right thing to do at this time when we have huge deficits. they don't believe that's the right way. that's the point he was making. to go further and accuse him of not liking firefighters and police -- >> he's not for cutting firefighters or teachers. >> no, no. >> after the stimulus, and i think that the 2010 midterm elections showed that a lot of people in this country have a lot of concern when the only part of the economy that democrats want to help is the public sector job growth. so i think governor romney's on very solid ground saying that it can't be out of whack, we can't keep continuing to add into infinite numbers of firefighters and teachers. >> the ryan budget, which he's endorses as you know, would provide for very substantial
3:14 am
reductions in aid that would translate into firemen and teachers. >> that wasn't the fight romney was trying to pick with obama. romney was saying these aren't the only kind of jobs we should be adding to fuel our economy. >> let me ask you this. is "usa today," is that still the most read newspaper in america? >> it's the most widely circulated. >> most widely circulated. >> yeah. >> probably good reason for it, because we could talk about spain and euro -- >> not there. >> i don't -- >> instead -- >> here. >> what's there. >> a pie chart that says four out of five americans don't want to talk about spain. >> can you blame them? >> they're not talking about all of this stuff. they're talking about -- "usa today," i love them for it, look at that, boys. the beatles -- yeah, the beatles turn 50. 1962. of course we're all beatle maniacs. the beatles went in and started
3:15 am
recording in '62 and 50 years ago, this last friday. >> you know they're not an american band, right? >> i didn't know that. they recorded their first song, which was -- the first hit? >> "love me do". >> look at you. >> wow. >> june 6th, 1962. 50 years into it. so you -- you were old enough to remember them. i was not. you saw them on ed sullivan. >> i saw them on ed sullivan. i didn't go to shea stadium but i remember them being at shea stadium and the commotion that surrounded them. >> you couldn't afford the $3 tickets. >> were you old enough to remember? >> sadly know. >> i saw the scopes. more to our point, joe, the show being what it is, it's the 40th anniversary of the watergreat break-in and you saw woodward and bernstein -- >> today is? >> i think it was over the weekend. >> the week. >> woodward and bernstein on
3:16 am
"face the nation" giving a joint interview for the first time talking about what it was like. >> wow. >> we can't have a boeatles reunion but we can have a woodward and bernstein. >> let's talk about spain really quickly and, you know, steve, you were worried about what was going to be happening over the next couple weeks. do they avoid the meltdown that could be devastating to this country? >> this is like the little boy who put his finger in the [ inaudible ], but you have a bunch of fingers put in a bunch of dikes and -- think of the hoover dam, has managed to keep this dam from breaking and cascading and this was what -- this was the least they had to do at the latest possible moment. spain had been resisting any kind of a bailout. they didn't want to be lumped in with such despicable places as portugal and greece. they are spain. but in the end, they took one. they're trying to convince the
3:17 am
world it's only for the banks. the rest of spain is doing just fine, thank you. and they will, in all likelihood, save their banks and solve their problem. but this ongoing cascade, like the game wacamole, whack one down and three more pop up, is just going to continue because they're not deal with any of their fundamental problems and the markets will be up today, we will have a respite from this, and then something else will happen. >> and mark, last night, of course, you were home eating your bon-bones in your robe and watching the tonys. >> i was. >> we saw who the big winners were. >> "once in particular" i've seen "once." they won lots like eight tonys based on the movie. >> steve, do you go a good bit? >> i try to. i saw "death of a salesman" which won best play, few other things. maybe not as often as mark. >> they played mike nicoles off, i thought that was a little
3:18 am
weird. >> played him off? >> like in the middle of his speech and they cut him off, started playing the music. >> you do that to mike nickles? >> "cliburn park". >> pulitzer and tony. >> and our friend is coming, jordan roth. maybe he can get us tickets to it. >> can you stay up that late? >> i can now. i've turned over a new leave. >> night owl? >> what does that mean? >> that means is, you keep waking up at -- >> earlier and earlier. >> 4:00 a.m. and at some point, after about five years of it, you realize you haven't done anything after 7:00 at night. and that it's time to start having a life. >> kind of like having a newborn. >> yeah. >> except you have to -- except you have to wake up at 3:30 every morning. >> i was up at 3:30. >> for five years. >> not five years. six months. >> if that thing is still getting you up at 3:30 five years from now, come talk to me. >> i have a situation. >> you have a situation. >> i need a nanny.
3:19 am
>> you need baby ambien. we'll talk about that. we have a lot more when we come back. mike allen is going to join us on set. he has the top stories in the politico playbook. we're going to be talking to republican senator john barrasso of wyoming. also my god, can i -- what have i done to deserve this? i love him. the mayor of london, boris johnson, will be here. explaining why if you vote for him, you will have a bmw in your garage, more money in your pocket, and a wife with larger breasts. yes, that's what he promises when he's on the campaign knocking door to door in london. it's worked because he just got re-elected. also, we've got the editor of the new yorker david remnick who says the same thing about subscribing to his magazine and also a story of niall ferguson who writes europe could cost president obama the election. bill karins has a check on the
3:20 am
forecast. bill, my iphone always tells me it's going to rain and yet every weekend i'm in the pool swimming with the kids. it's like, i don't know if the iphone is good at spin control or not or what's going on, but i'm always delighted by what i find. >> yes. the worst weather app in the world. like 20% chance of rain and will tell you thunderstorms are coming. >> yeah. >> call me. e-mail. joe, actually i have a question for you. have you ever been here? take a look at this picture i got for you. brent lane in downtown pensacola. >> i know brent lane well. >> near the pensacola christian college. this picture here was from the weekend. i don't think it's supposed to have a river running down past that burger king. but pensacola had record rainfall, millions of dollars worth of damage was done. this was mostly on saturday in the area. officially at the airport, we had 13 inches of rain. second wettest day ever in pensacola history. west pensacola, a rain gauge picked up 21 inches of rain. that's where the worst weather was this weekend. mobile is getting thunderstorms and heavy rain.
3:21 am
thankfully pensacola has dried out and slowly improving. the forecast today, no worries for any rain today for joe or anyone else from new york through new england, but around pittsburgh we'll have a chance of some showers and thunderstorms. down in the southeast, we continue that rain threat, atlanta through the carolinas today. eventually all that rain will move up the eastern seaboard, so it's a dry day today, d.c., new york, but tomorrow, the thunderstorms will arrive here. also in the middle of the country today, the only other spot i'm concerned with is kansas city. you have thunderstorms this morning that you have to deal with. if you can delay your commute by maybe an hour or two try to do so. you're watching "morning joe" we're brewed by starbucks. ♪
3:22 am
♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, every innovation, every solution, comes together for a single purpose -- to make the world a safer place. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman.
3:23 am
to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yelling ] [ male announcer ] find out more at... [ duck ] aflac! [ male announcer ] ...forbusiness.com. ♪ ha ha!
3:24 am
♪ never see what you want to
3:25 am
see ♪ >> mark, can i say growing up, i could never put my arms around them, because i was always a beatles guy and a stones guy and they were always a little too light. >> i don't mean this negative, asexual. they really were. i mean that, you know, you've got certain -- >> manly rock and then sort of -- >> yeah, yeah. >> but they -- but they wrote some dam great songs. this is a great one, isn't it? what's your favorite? >> this one. >> is it? >> yeah. >> a little billy joel-ish. >> amazing. you don't like song? >> not at all. >> [ inaudible ]. it's so nice when mika is not here because we can talk about music. we can talk about music and sports. >> eat what you want. >> have a big old muffin there.
3:26 am
>> i'm not eating anything. >> we can talk about ell. >> they are good. >> i underestimate them until you and heilemann start going through the hits they had, and songs all these years later when i'm down, can you put in my ears "mr. blue sky" boom that's a classic one. turn it up, t.j. >> we're going to have a moment. >> what you might have been if you had more time, that's what i ask myself all the time. the morning papers, "usa today," a new study finds working adults who routinely sleep less than six hours a night, that's me, are more than four times likely to suffer a stroke. that's me. a three-year study focused on people who were generally in good health and not overweight. 30% of americans routinely sleep less than six hours a night. experts recommend between seven and nine. quickly, i know you work around the clock, you're trying to get
3:27 am
that thing ready, how much sleep do you usually get? >> at least six. jim vandehei says that's what you need to be healthy, and wise. >> what time do you get to bed? >> 10-ish. >> and sleep until 4:00, 4:30? >> yeah. >> what about you, mark? >> now that "mad men" is no longer on i'll be doing better. >> once a week. >> i know, but -- >> off the other nights. >> 6 1/2. >> usually get 6 1/2. >> i'm in this -- >> yoa mom -- >> when you're working on the campaign, how much do you get? >> the campaign hours, white house hours, i have to wake up when mike allen wakes up. >> usually about six hours. >> right. about six. which is broken up, but probably about the same that i'm getting these days, five or six. >> because you're five? >> about five hours, yeah. >> that would not be enough for me. i would be an unsafe driver. >> you know -- >> unsafe -- >> the thing is, i get home and
3:28 am
i can't sleep during the day. i get home and when i get home, i'm exhausted, but i get out of the car and i go, and walk in because i have two young kids and you have to be an energetic daddy. when they wind down i can start to wind down. usually they don't wind down until about 9:30 or 10:00. >> how many alarm douse have? >> i don't have alarms. i'm used to waking up at 3:30, 4:00, like if there's a really late event, and i'm out until 11:30 shaking hands or something like that, then yeah, i'll put an alarm on just to make sure. but if we're out of town, my alarm usually is lewis. the phone just starts ringing. >> he's still up from the night before. >> he's still up from the night before. lewis doesn't go to sleep. >> not on the road, i'll tell you that. >> lewis actually sleeps at the desk. he figures i'm -- i sleep at my desk anyway, so i might as well stay up all night and have a
3:29 am
good time. >> once you're in the chair he's good. >> this is my alarm clock, you ask. this is my alarm clock. lewis j. bergdorf iii. >> first of all, i love this new toy here. >> it's the radner chart. the chart-o-mattic. what are you looking at mike, today? >> today we talk to pollsters for both obama and romney about the likability factor for so long, as you guys know, the president's men and women have been saying that the one thing that they have in their back pocket is there's no chance, zero chance, that mitt romney will ever be more likable than barack obama. and going back to at least carter, we've always picked the more obviously likable person, '41, clinton, george w. bush over anybody, barack obama. will that change this year? and the romney people say yes, he's likable, but the -- their idea from focus groups and polls
3:30 am
is that voters will say, he's likable enough, but he didn't get the job done. where the obama pollsters say he's someone who's comfortable with himself. comfortable in his own skin and that translates to voters. >> yeah. i think, nicole, i have seen barack obama on stage. i remember one time in the '08 campaign where he was walking around on stage talking to the audience members, he was like, hey, feed your kid good breakfast. don't give them cold fried chicken from the night before. >> sounds like bill clinton. >> and everybody is laughing but he's also telling a truth. he was like you've got a responsibility, the government can take care of a lot, but you've got to take care of a lot. when he's just walking back and forth talking, you're like, boy, nobody is better than this. i always thought, nothing personally towards you, because i'm sure bush would have done what bush would have always
3:31 am
wanted to do, but they should never have him in a formal setting where he watches into the east room and stares into the lights and looks scared to death. if he has to hold a conference, everybody has to get on the plane and go to crawford, texas. >> nicole is getting flashbacks. >> every candidate has their thing where they're comfortable. everyone. i don't care who it is. what should the obama white house be doing? because the president isn't good in these formal settings and he's not good sitting -- terrible sitting in the oval office desk but great in different settings. what should they be doing with him? >> some of the most -- some of the memories that are the most seared into my brain were the interviews we would do with president bush where he would do fine in an interview, but maybe struggle to articulate a point that was of particular import and then the cameras would get shut off, the crew would start to break down, and he would continue to chat with whoever it
3:32 am
was, brian williams or elizabeth vargas, whoever it was, and people would just sit there riveted. you could hear a pin drop. sometimes the crew would stop breaking down and listen to. and dan bartlett and i would sometimes be in the back going, why didn't he sound like this when they were rolling? i'm sure that -- >> he always, he always tightened up when the lights were on. >> and he was always and is always quite brilliant and relatable and quick when the cameras are off. i don't know if that's just a normal human condition or if that was something that particular particularly haunted him in those public interviews. but i think that what a president does off camera with his press corps, and this may make me old fashioned and get me railed on by rush limbaugh and my friends on the right but i think what a president does off camera with the members of their press corps, the reporters that go to work every day at the white house, that travel with
3:33 am
them, is priceless. and i think that bringing in the members of your press corps who leave their families behind to get on a plane, usually a plane that flies behind air force one and arrives six hours earlier and leaves 12 hours later and that's the plane that has mechanical problem and the heat and air conditioner doesn't always work, that's the plane that isn't the luxury liner that air force one is, i think what a president does with that press corps to show he understands how difficult it is for those people to cover the white house and to cover the president, is priceless, particularly in a campaign year. >> how does this president do with the press corps? do they get a feeling that he doesn't like them? keeping him at a distance? pretty good relationship? what do you think? >> it's pretty good, but it's not the way it was in 2008. he doesn't have the absolute advantage he had in 2008, and i think the romney campaign is making an effort to try to get their candidate out there with their press corps and with national reporters a little bit more. i think both of them are pretty
3:34 am
far removed at this point. >> there has been very little. this president is starting to do more behind the scenes and this weekend we saw he was gifted at it, vice president biden who had the press corps over to his lawn for his third annual beach party, the vice president, after taking pictures with all the reporters, changed into his shorts and a polo shirt and armed with squirt guns was going after the press corps, including targeting jay carney. >> oh, my goodness. >> former reporter. >> former reporter. >> mike, thank you so much. it's always great to have you here. >> thank you. real quick, want to talk job creation? politico, this fall, creating 50 new jobs, we announced today, the scoop in "the new york times," 24 new journalists, 24 people on the business side, cover tax policy, financial services, defense, dying industry we're thriving. >> congratulations. happy days are here again. we're going to -- >> now you can get print politico in new york. >> that's important. very important. >> thank you so much. tomorrow morning, "morning joe"
3:35 am
is going to be live from chicago. we're going to see some politico, take them over there as well. be there to see how goldman sachs, 10,000 small businesses program is helping both entrepreneurs and the entire city economies. warren buffett and mayor rahm emanuel will be joining us. also we're going to check in on ground zero for the obama re-election campaign. former white house chief of staff bill daly will be our guest. we bring in luke russert, he has sports. keep it here on "morning joe." [ jennifer ] what if i can't do it? what if i can't lose the weight? what if weight watchers can't help me? what if i'm not ready for change? what if i fall back into old habits? what if i lose control? what if i gain it all back?
3:36 am
what if there's always an excuse why i can't? what if i can't follow through? what if i fail? shhh. there's only one voice worth listening to and that's the one saying you can do this. i'm standing here still in control of my weight with weight watchers, telling you to believe in that voice. join for $1. weight watchers. believe. because it works. to your kids' wet skin. neutrogena® wet skin kids. ordinary sunblock drips and whitens. neutrogena® wet skin cuts through water. forms a broad spectrum barrier for full strength sun protection. wet skin. neutrogena®.
3:37 am
3:38 am
3:39 am
welcome back to "morning joe." a live shot of washington, d.c., where "morning joe" us "morning joe's" beat reporter for sports is standing by with sweaty little hands, luke russert. >> these are big hands, my friend. these aren't little hands. these are big, american hands. >> i'm sorry. let me correct myself, with his tiny, sweaty little hands, luke russert, with the morning sports.
3:40 am
luke, what a -- what a series between those heat and those celtics this weekend. >> the heat and too bad, but celtic pride until the end, they held on to it and the miami heat will return to the finals for the second straight year after dispatching the celtics in game seven of the eastern conference finals. lebron james and the heat will face a thunder team that looked unstoppable while reeling off four straight wins against the spurs. that series tips off tomorrow night at 8:00 p.m. eastern time from oklahoma city. d.c.'s own kevin durant, i think the best player in the league, better than lebron, that's me. baseball. nationals going for the sweep of the red sox at fen way. yours truly was there. game tied at 3, bryce harper taking off from first on the pitch. roger lifts one into the right field corner. harper had the green light all the way home. the relay throw is mishandled. harper slides to give them the lead. last chance for the sox two outs in the ninth, dustin pedroia doesn't like the umpire's strike
3:41 am
call and neither does bobbie valentine. he comes out to state his case and going to get his money's worth. pedroia would strike out, swinging to end the game and the nationals get the win, 4-3, to extend their lead in the nl east. boston falls two games below .500 after the weekend sweep and after the game, bobbie valentine who was ejected had strong words about the officiates in the series. >> good umpires had real bad series this series. it went one way. the game is simple. throw it over the plate, call it a strike. don't throw it over the plate, call it a ball. it's simple. that's all. that's all anybody asks. and i know it's been going on for 100 years. i'm not the first one to say it, but this was a pretty lousy series. >> from red sox nation to yankees universe, looking to sweep the mets in the subway series in the bronx. mets down one, ike davis shoots one into the gap in right cen r center. pull up at second with a double.
3:42 am
that will tie the game at four. bottom of the ninth, russell martins lifts one to deep left will carry out for a walk-off home run, yankees win 5-4, one eight of the last ten and half game behind the devil rays in the al east. don't call them the rays anymore but i like that old school classic. the yankees big league club enjoying a successful weekend, the minor league in charlotte had bill maherry. during a rain delay, murray is running around the tarp sacrificing his body as he rounds third and slides safely into home. bill murray showing the minor leaguers how it gets done. joe -- >> nice. >> how about the washington nationals, my friend, sweeping at fenway, first team to do that in the national league since 2008. get on the nates bandwagon, plenty of room. >> the nationals, man, they are for real, aren't they? >> break up the nates, best pitching in the league. >> yep. now are you guys going to start getting more than five, 6,000
3:43 am
people coming to the games? >> we had a lot of good sellouts last -- two weeks ago versus the atlanta braves. the yankees coming up this weekend. >> great. >> i suspect we will have four straight -- three straight 42,000 games there. it will be nice. >> awesome. great baseball. thank you so much, luke. we will be talking to you very soon. >> always a pleasure, my friend. be well. >> you too. coming up next, president obama says the private sector is doing just fine. we're going to get a fact check from our own steve rattner and his magical charts. that's next on "morning joe."
3:44 am
you want to save money on car insurance? no problem. you want to save money on rv insurance? no problem. you want to save money on motorcycle insurance? no problem.
3:45 am
you want to find a place to park all these things? fuggedaboud it. this is new york. hey little guy, wake up! aw, come off it mate! geico. saving people money on more than just car insurance.
3:46 am
and on small business saturday bothey remind a nations of the benefits of shopping small. on just one day, 100 million of us joined a movement... and main street found its might again. and main street found its fight again. and we, the locals, found delight again. that's the power of all of us. that's the power of all of us. that's the membership effect of american express. ♪ welcome back to "morning
3:47 am
joe." a sunny day in june. [ inaudible ]. >> i love june. >> it's wonderful. >> fourth favorite month. >> fourth favorite. >> really? >> september -- no october. >> tell me. >> march, december, january, september. >> really? >> why? what do you like about january? >> what do you like about january? nothing to like about january. >> richard nixon's birthday, elvis' birthday, my birthday. >> okay. >> lot going on. >> i hate january. >> super bowl. >> but june, though, man, stays light so late. >> yeah. >> i was driving last night, driving around with the family and it's like 8:00 and the sun, the light is still beautiful hitting. >> you paid your quarterly taxes yet? >> no? that's one reason june is not high on my list. >> you are a scrooge. the scrooge that stole summer. >> i was going to say what you were, you are a blanked up man, but i don't want to have to figure out whether the
3:48 am
seven-second delay works or not. it's amazing. >> you come back to me when you've written those checks. >> i don't have a lot of time to obsess about golfing. never had time to golf, but in june i would always take my clubs out when growing up, and i would tee off at like 6:30, nobody else on the course, and you just go 18 holes, walking. be done by about 9:00. that's amazing. see the sun light, sunset. you have no idea what i'm talking about. >> you can still do that, joe. it's still out there for you. >> i know. i've gotten too old. >> it is nice to get up to do this program with it light outside. >> yeah, it is nice. >> that's nice. >> not walking in -- i was going to talk about something but i'll forget it. i'll see you later. have a pleasant tomorrow. steve rattner has your charts. steve, there are different ways to look at job creation. let's walk through them right now. >> went through a debate last week about job creation. we thought it would be useful to go back and visit the many ways, the three kinds of lies, right,
3:49 am
joe? what are they? >> three kinds. >> lies, dam lies and statistics. >> i hear laughing behind me. >> so a lot of ways to look at jobs and everybody is trying to look at it the way most favorable. let's remind everybody about what the options are. if you go back to the start of the recession, back in december of '07, cumulatively through today, we are still almost 5 million jobs short in total. because of the recession was so deep throughout that period, remember that when the president took office in january of '09, we were losing about 700,000 jobs a month. it was one of the worst periods of job loss throughout and then it started to turn back upward. and so what's interesting, i was a little surprised to see this, was that the president's total record, if you start from inauguration and go until now, is actually 5,000 private -- 55,000 private sector jobs
3:50 am
created but a net loss of 550,000 because of what's happening in the government sector. so that's one way to look at president's record. if you go to the end of the recession, which was in july of '09, and you see what's happened. there have been 2.5 million total jobs created, 2.1 million of them -- 3.1 million, excuse me, in the private sector. now this last column is the one not surprisingly that is the favorite of the white house and what you hear so much about. you hear about the 4.3 million jobs created. those are private sector jobs and it's a real number, these numbers are all accurate, 4.3 million jobs created since the bottom of the job market in the private sector with the government lagging behind. so those are the various ways that people can look at how the jobs numbers are falling out. >> obviously, steve, swing voters are going to be asking questions like, has this president gotten back all the
3:51 am
jobs during the recession in what's the answer to that? >> the answer is no. we're still close to 5 million jobs short across both the public and the private sectors, given the depth of the recess n recession. >> at the rate of growth, how long would it take for us to get those 5 million jobs back? >> at the rate we're growing now, it would take four years or something like that. >> okay. >> we're creating a small number of jobs. look at the next chart which struck me also. these are comparing the last four presidents and their record of job creation. bill clinton not surprisingly, is off the chart at the top. in terms of job creation. george h.w. bush who lost re-election in part because people felt we were slow in recession and not doing well on jobs, didn't do so badly, but then you have bush '43 and obama really neck and neck in terms of the number of jobs they've created since they've been in office. i would freely concede that this is a tougher poll for obama because so many jobs were lost before he got here, but it is interesting to see this. as you know, we've talked about
3:52 am
this, the polls lately show barack obama very much in the same position george bush was in 2004 in terms of approval ratings and so forth. we talked a little bit last week and this fleshes out this last chart. next chart anyway. the job growth by sector, and the point that everybody needs to bear in mind is that you've had a very unbalanced job recovery. it's a little bit like the strong sectors over on the right, professions, education, health, are swimming with a weight tied around them because you've got government first and foremost because of all those cutbacks i was referring to earlier, losing 600,000 jobs, you've got construction losing 500,000 jobs, and then you've got information which is publishing and media which we are a part, losing 166,000 jobs and finance kind of breaking even. you've got the sectors on the left that are actually holding back the job creation and the ones on the right that are doing it. the ones on the left represent
3:53 am
28% of all the jobs. it is hard to have robust job creation when you have a number of sectors under performing. >> what's your takeaway looking at all the charts? obviously you don't agree with the president that the economy is strong right now. that the private sector is doing fine. but how would you -- how would you grade it? >> look, i said when the last jobs number came out, there was nothing good to be said about it because it was so far below expectations. i think the reasonable expectation is that we're going to have very slow incremental job growth a between now and the election and an unemployment rate that's one side or the other of 8% by a small amount. that's the hand the president is going to be playing in this election in terms of the substance. what he can do with it politically, what policies he can craft around it we'll see. in terms of where the economy is likely to be at absent meltdowns and europe and things like that that's where the substance will be. >> steve rattner thank you so much. we love it. the rattner charts. strike again.
3:54 am
we have more "morning joe" straight ahead. stick around. tomorrow, look at this, we're live from chicago. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is corporate caterers, miami, florida. in here, great food demands a great presentation. so at&t showed corporate caterers how to better collaborate by using a mobile solution, in a whole new way. using real-time photo sharing abilities, they can create and maintain high standards, from kitchen to table. this technology allows us to collaborate with our drivers to make a better experience for our customers. [ male announcer ] it's a network of possibilities -- helping you do what you do... even better. ♪ tdd# 1-800-345-2550 you and your money deserve. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 at charles schwab, that means taking a close look at you tdd# 1-800-345-2550 as well as your portfolio. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 we ask the right questions, tdd# 1-800-345-2550 then we actually listen to the answers
3:55 am
tdd# 1-800-345-2550 before giving you practical ideas you can act on. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 so talk to chuck online, on the phone, tdd# 1-800-345-2550 or come in and pull up a chair. dude you don't understand, this is my dad's car. look at the car! my dad's gonna kill me dude... [ male announcer ] the security of a 2012 iihs top safety pick. the volkswagen passat. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease the 2012 passat for $209 a month. visit vwdealer.com today.
3:56 am
we make meeting times, lunch times and conference times. but what we'd rather be making are tee times. tee times are the official start of what we love to do. the time for shots we'd rather forget, and the ones we'll talk about forever. in michigan long days, relaxing weather and more than 800 pristine courses make for the perfect tee time. because being able to play all day is pure michigan. your trip begins at michigan.org.
3:57 am
coming up, the editor of the new yorker and also a story in niall ferguson, explains why europe could cost president
3:58 am
obama the election plus bizarre story, coming out of washington, d.c., involving a cabinet secretary. we'll tell you about it. i needed a coach. our doctor was great, but with so many tough decisions i felt lost. unitedhealthcare offered us a specially trained rn who helped us weigh and understand all our options. for me cancer was as scary as a fastball is to some of these kids. but my coach had hit that pitch before. turning data into useful answers. we're 78,000 people looking out for 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare.
3:59 am
4:00 am
sven's home security gets the most rewards of any small business credit card! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve the most rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. what if i can't lose the weight? what if weight watchers can't help me? what if i'm not ready for change? what if i fall back into old habits? what if i lose control? what if i gain it all back? what if there's always an excuse why i can't? what if i can't follow through? what if i fail? shhh. there's only one voice worth listening to and that's the one saying you can do this. i'm standing here still in control of my weight with weight watchers, telling you to believe in that voice.
4:01 am
join for $1. weight watchers. believe. because it works. i'm mitt romney and i approve this message. >> tonight on "world news," the worst jobs number in a year. >> the may numbers came out and are not good. >> may dismal jobs report. >> employment rate up to 8.2%. >> overall here, nowhere to hide given this report.
4:02 am
>> the private sector is doing fine. where we're seeing weaknesses in our economy have to do with state and local government. the private sector is doing fine. ♪ >> he says we need more firemen, more policemen, more teachers, did he not get the message in wisconsin, the american people did, it's time for us to cut back on government and help the american people. >> turn governor romney's tenure local government was cut dramatically. we lost police, firefighters, teachers at rapid rates, people that impacted the lives of every citizens. our cities were less safe, not as clean, larger class sizes. >> schools, fire, police, all the basic services we rely on are poorer for mitt romney's administration.
4:03 am
>> welcome back to "morning joe." some happy, happy cheerful web ads to get you started on this monday morning. we have nicolle wallace to help you out as well. mark halperin is here joining us on set, editor of "the new yorker" david remnick, the latest issue involving a piece looking at what a second term of barack obama's administration might be like. but we have to start by having no spoiler alerts, we're all talking about "mad men." i did not see it last night. too late for me. i'm going to watch it today when i get home. did everybody see it last night? >> i did. >> i'm going to watch it today. >> david, you saw it last night? >> oh, yeah. >> bafo? >> pretty dam good. >> really good. >> i'll tell you, the last and we all agree on this, last three weeks of "mad men" have been nothing short of extraordinary television, right? >> outrageously good. >> yeah. i thought last night's episode -- i don't want to spoil
4:04 am
it for you -- but the rest of america may have seen it, it ends with a kind of baffling return to form for our hero. >> yeah. >> beware. won't see it again for months now. >> you know, the -- we were talking about our favorite parts. i was talking about my favorite part of this and last week with layne, unbelievable, peggy's decision to leave, unbelievable. joan. i mean these are all just sort of like "downton abby" like every week a war starts. >> i think it's better written. when you look at that episode with joan, is using herself and her sexuality to become a partner, but prostitution is the theme throughout the entire episode, every character on it one way or another has to confront the prostitute in himself or herself. it's written beautifully, everything weaves together. it's a special show. doesn't happen every week or year. >> it doesn't. the part that i was talking about that i loved so much
4:05 am
through the series, i thought the moment that really divided the series this season and divided the entire series, was when don young's wife was going off to acting class and, you know, this is 1966, which is dead in the center culturally of the 1960s, she hands him a revolver and i immediately see -- >> i know. >> this revolver, it's going to be, you know, here, there, everywhere, no, she tells him to put on tomorrow never knows, which is john lennon's trippy -- it's lsd inspired. and it starts playing and it goes through the sequence and you see her going off, running off and don sitting there and here you have this world war ii vet, who you know used to make out with women to sinatra. >> right. >> and here he's listening to this brave new world and at the end he picks it up, turns it off, and walks in his room and
4:06 am
you're like, the -- >> it's the best use of music in a series since the sopranos, one of the great part of the s sopranos, doing a movie about an old rock and roll band. >> i understand matthew winer may have paid something like $250,000 for that. it was worth every dime. >> what will we do for the next couple months? >> we have an election. we could keep watching "beep" last night. >> you have to stay up later. >> i can't stay up later. i wake up at 3:30! >> we talked about that last hour. >> have you been watching "beep". >> you bet. >> it's funny. the first one or two weren't that great, but holy cow, those things really took off. >> "andrea mitchell reports" never goes on hiatus. >> we always have that. so david, ryan lizza looks at what a second obama administration would look like
4:07 am
in your magazine. >> with caveats throughout the administration that god knows he hasn't won it yet because this one tight election and will be to the end of november. >> what would it like if he did win? >> on the foreign policy side, which is obviously the side they want to highlight, they want to move from the engagements of south asia, from afghanistan, iraq and so on, to a much more forward-looking foreign policy having to do with china but also with issues like nuclear proliferation and the environment. we've all been to briefings where these have been sketched out very firmly, but that's not where the battleground of the election itself will be played, obviously. what's going to happen is you're going to see obama trying to sell a very, very low hand of cards in this election because he has to convince the american people of something that's very hard to do in an election. a recession like the one we experienced in 2008/2009 is never going to recover quickly
4:08 am
and he has to emphasize the political over the economic news, otherwise he is in deep, deep trouble. deep, deep trouble. he has to emphasize the recall se trants of the republican party to the success or failure of his own parties. it's as clear as that. they are very wary of a story looking at a second term. and the piece begins with, previous presidents running for a second term, and the memos they get, like the reagan people getting, and people in the reagan administration emphasizing the need for clarity. i don't think you've gotten it quite yet from the obama side. >> what have you gathered about, i guess my first question about if barack obama is re-elected president of the united states, how does he deal with a republican congress? because david gergen and i were talking a couple days ago and we
4:09 am
both agreed that both parties are living in this all ter nate universe when you ask him, how are you going to move forward and get anything done, they both believed that they're going to sweep it. >> oh, nobody's going to sweep anything. >> of course we all know this. >> nobody is going to sweep anything. >> we know this. we know there's going to be divided government and i had one democrat tell me -- well the president is going to win and -- i said even if the president wins the white house -- >> narrow victory. >> even if you take back the house, even if you take back the senate, mitch mcconnell will have 49 senators and you're not going to get anything done that mitch mcconnell doesn't want done and you can reverse that, if mitt wins, republicans win, then -- >> on the other hand a victory is a victory and if you get to a situation like last summer where you have a debt crisis like last summer i think the republican party will be in deep, deep crisis if it behaves the way it did last year. deep crisis after a victory.
4:10 am
and also -- >> you can say that -- >> but the politics of the moment, the economic necessity, the national priority to solve these problems, is so intense, not just that problem, that these parties are going to have to find a way to behave in a more logical way. it's demanded of them by the american people. >> the white house does not realize now and the president does not realize right now, that his mere re-election will not make the republicans find him to be any more legitimate than bill clinton's re-election made him lenl mate and they're actually believing right now, i know this, and you probably know this, they actually believe if we win the second time, then they're going to look at us as a legitimate force. i've been told that by people really high up in the white house, and it doesn't work that way. likewise with mitt romney. if mitt romney gets elected president, good luck. because i think both sides are going to have a lot of hard, hard time governing. >> you see the democratic party denying the legitimacy of the
4:11 am
election of mitt romney if it's not -- if there's no situation like florida in the bush election of 2004, i'm not sure the democratic party will deny the ledgitimacy. >> what i'm talking about -- >> in the republican party you do see these or at least the right wing of the republican party, a real denial of legitimacy. >> i saw that. i don't want to get into this but i saw that from george w. bush from the left wing. it's republicans treated bill clinton terribly for eight years. democrats got back at george w. bush by treating him terribly for eight years. republicans will do the same towards barack obama. >> there's a difference, though. joe, there's a difference though. the republicans treated bill clinton terribly on an impeachment scandal about which we all know. the democrats we're having at the bush administration for the most part on policy. >> that is not true. that is not true. let me just jump in, though.
4:12 am
barack obama won and his first act as president was to announce to a meeting of congressional leaders, i won and i'm going to ram through the stimulus that i want. he set the tone when it comes to governing by the way that he went about with his first and signature step to try to heal the economy. so i think republicans and know -- >> which is policy. >> mainstream republican -- but republicans have -- it was not just policy the tone in which he went out and enacting his first policy. republicans came to the table with some ideas for the first stimulus and president obama didn't want anything to do with them. he said the stimulus is going to be my way or the highway. now he paid mightily in 2010 because the public hated his brand of stimulus, they hated his health care reform. he's already paid a political price. but it's not just that republicans didn't question his legitimacy. in fact, i worked for the losing candidate in '08 had who had a lot to do with setting a tone of
4:13 am
embracing the new president as entirely legitimate. i think it's dangerous and polarizing to throw around the chart -- >> there's a difference between what george bush said after the obama election -- >> mean mccain? >> no. what bush himself said about obama's election and what mccain said about obama's election. >> they were two of the most graceful moments in american politics. >> i totally agree. >> john mccain's concession speech -- >> he was the leader of the republican party at that moment and it was one of the most graceful concession speeches i think in modern times. >> i agree with that. that's not all of the republican party and it's not the right wing of the republican party, the hard right. i think there's a difference. >> i could show you if i could actually purchase them, for six years, george w. bush in various nazi uniforms sold by our friends on the upper west side for six years. >> i didn't see one and i live on the upper west side.
4:14 am
not one nazi uniform. >> you didn't go out on sunday afternoons. >> yeah, i do. >> no, i did. everywhere and bush hated the constitution and bush was trashing the constitution and bush should be up for war crimes. it was a constant, constant droning that i just shrugged my shoulders and said -- >> wait. there -- during the bush administration, there were legitimate issues having to do with constitutionality or not you could argue. the prosecution of the iraq war. >> and president obama has carried out most of the foreign policy that ignited the rage of the left. that's sort of funny. >> including -- >> we've written about both and both heavily critical. look, the job of journalism is to put pressure on power not just one party. >> including dropping drone bombs in countries where we haven't even declared war. if we want to talk about war tribunals, my goodness, let's not stack those two up. >> you're in the minority in the coverage and the attention
4:15 am
you've paid to that, but the -- >> look, jane mayor wrote an incredibly critical piece about the use of the moral question surrounding the use of drones. >> okay. we need to go to london. we've got professor of history at harvard university, niall ferguson, his new piece is in the new issue of "newsweek" titled "how europe could cost obama the election." niall, we get a sense of talking to several people that have been dealing with the european situation, that the next week or two are very critical to what's going on, not only in greece but also across the entire eurozone. what can you tell us? >> well, you probably assumed that the election in november will be decided in, i don't know, ohio or florida, but i think there's good reason to think it could be decided in greece or spain. i've spent the last four weeks traveling around europe since the end of harvard classes and it's pretty scary. it's a complex story if you follow it closely, like the worst soap opera you ever
4:16 am
watched, but right now, a bit of breathing space in spain, little bit of breathing space in spain for the banks there. but we have a greek election coming up that could blow a hole in the european monetary union and i think this is the key point, joe, all that is happening here, the way it is increasing uncertainty in global markets, the way it is depressing american exports to europe, is increasing the probability that mitt romney will be president come the end of the year and we'll be looking back on the piece in the "new yorker" as one of the fine bits of fiction "the new yorker" is known for because the second obama term will be consigned to the relp of fiction. i was just in washington last week, there were lots of signals coming my way that they are really scared that the europeans are going to screw this up. and in particular, the german government is going to move too slowly to stop a major bank run and the breakup of the monetary union. i mean that really would send a massive shock wave across the
4:17 am
atlantic, worse than anything we've seen so far. >> mark halperin. >> any indication the united states is playing a constructive or active role in trying to sort out the european economic situation? >> i think it is. i think that the administration is leaning hard on angela merkel, the german chancellor. i'm not sure how much impact that really makes in berlin. the real pressure is coming -- the real effective pressure is coming from inside the eurozone from the new french president francois hollande and his counterpart in rome, mario monte. i think the u.s. is making noises, but i'm not sure that they're really going to be decisive in all of this this is an intra-european crisis and the u.s. has to pretty much walk on par. >> niall, this is david remnick. what is greece going to do in these elections, faced with a series of horrible choices with the electorate and leadership there. what is going to be the outcome there and what are the consequences of that? >> well, david, right now what you've seen is a real
4:18 am
fragmentation of the greek party political scene that the stallwarts of the post-dictatorship era, the new democracy the more conservative party have hemorrhaged votes to the extremes and when you've got a hard left party that is threatening to abrogate greece's commitments under the two bailouts and a near nazi party which has been riding high, golden dawn, it's a little bit like a rerun of the history of germ my, but relocated to athens and that is really a big concern because it's very hard to form a stable government under this kind of a circumstance. they failed the last time. the reason we're having these elections is that the last elections were completely inconclusive and nobody could form a government. and the big worry has to be that the populace of the left and right will do so well that once again, greece won't be able to form a stable government. that's a big worry because if there's any probability of a
4:19 am
greek exit from european monetary union you'll see a contagion of fear spreading to spain and perhaps also to portugal, france, italy. if noeshgs o if, for example, one country can leave, think of it this way, your euros, if you're a greek citizen, could become track mas overnight. that could happen to greece it could happen to any of the other mediterranean countries. these obscure party political maneuvers in europe will have a huge impact on the u.s. election, much bigger than most people in the u.s. realize. >> let's talk also, americans look at greece and what's happening and we just wonder why they can't do the responsible thing. you look at france. and i understand in large part, sar zoe zi was booted out, he was not liked by the french peop people, but you have a new leader over there that promises to lower the retirement age and
4:20 am
does down to 60 and the time of this debt crisis and i would guess bankers across the world are just thinking, maybe he's not getting it. europe doesn't understand that this is the 11th hour. >> also the greek economy has contracted already by 16% after austerity measures and it's in big trouble so you have people on the street who are furious, furious at the wealthy who they see as not paying taxes. everybody is furious at everybody and niall is right, you have politicians at either end of the spectrum just behaving ru nously, absolutely ruinously and germany may be moving too slowly and it's very hard for the american electorate, very hard for anybody at this table to see why such a small country's ruin or extraction from the eurozone could affect an entire presidential election in a country of 300 million people. it's an instance of the butterfly wing being felt all across the globe, but that's the
4:21 am
nature of globalization. >> exactly what's happening, isn't it, niall? >> one of the arguments i tried to make in "newsweek" to make all of this a little bit more accessible to american readers is, imagine if the u.s. had never passed the constitution and was still operating with the articles of confederation of 1781, in other words you didn't really have a strong federal government, and you'd be in a situation which, for example, new mexico would be going to delaware and asking for a bailout because right now, if you just look at the way the great recession has impacted american states it's very, very widely different depending on where you are in the country. so the europeans don't have a federal constitution. every single transfer from one country to another has to be haggled over on an ad hoc individual basis. that's the european problem. in a nutshell they have to try to get to something like a federal constitution in a matter of weeks or months in the midst of a catastrophic recession, even a depression in some cases, and that, of course, is
4:22 am
something that's going to be extremely difficult. i think they'll do it in the end, joe, because for the germans letting this thing fall apart is just too horrible a prospect. if it means ponying up a substantial amount of money to the mediterranean, i think in the end they'll do it. what worries me is before they make that decision we could have a lehman moment, a shock as big as lehman's brother failure, but on the european side of the atlantic. >> niall ferguson, thank you so much for being with us. we'll be looking for your new article in "newsweek." david recomme david remnick stick around, hopefully we'll get a spoiler from last night's finale of "mad men." we'll ask the mayor of london about the upcoming owe him pick games and his thought of mayor bloomberg's crackdown on sugary drinks. up next, senator barrasso of wyoming joins the conversation. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. ♪
4:23 am
[ male announcer ] from our nation's networks... ♪ ...to our city streets... ♪ ...to skies around the world... ♪ ...northrop grumman's security solutions are invisibly at work, protecting people's lives... [ soldier ] move out!
4:24 am
[ male announcer ] ...without their even knowing it. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman. droid does. and does it launch apps by voice while learning your voice ? launch cab4me. droid does. keep left at the fork. does it do turn-by-turn navigation ? droid does. with verizon, america's largest 4glte network and motorola, whatever you want to do... droid does.
4:25 am
4:26 am
♪ he wants another stimulus, he wants to hire more government workers. he says we need for firemen, more policemen, more teachers. did he not get the message of wisconsin? the american people did. it's time for us to cut back on government and help the american people. >> do you think governor romney is talking about getting rid of more teachers and firemen? >> no, i think in the end the big issue is that the private sector still needs more help and the answer is not more big government. i know in my state our reforms allowed us to protect firefighters, police officers, and teachers. that's not what i think when i think of big government. i think of the bigger sense is more government regulations, more stimulus, more things that take money out of the private sector and put it in the hands of the government. >> welcome back.
4:27 am
>> try that in pensacola. welcome back to "morning joe" on the set with us now, republican senator from wyoming, senator john barrasso. by the way, that laughing had nothing to do with whatever clip that was that we played before. so, mika came in from the south of france just to visit us. >> so nice. >> yes. >> we miss her today. >> she passed out my encrusted jewels and walked back off. >> gave the queenly wave and off she went again. so, anyway, so what do you think, senator? what do you think about the ryan budget and all this talk about how republicans are against firefighters and teachers and that there's some pretty massive cuts in there that would hurt? >> i want a healthy economy. i want to get people back to work. you saw the president on friday make a statement that he said the private sector is doing fine.
4:28 am
and it is not. but he was unscripted, wasn't reading from the teleprompter. i think that's what he believes. and that's -- americans get the fact that they still have 8.2% unemployment. if they have kids like i do, you worry about your kids being able to get jobs. kids coming out of school with huge debt and the president is running around college campuses, those kids can't find work. a month ago for every one person that found a job, three people gave up looking. >> dave? >> i think politicians make mistakes. they make -- have messups and unscripted moments. nicole and i were talking about that very press conference. it was a bad press conference. he made a mistake said something i don't really think he believes. he's realistic about the economy. i don't think he believes it any more than mitt romney thinks a person and a corporation are the exact same thing. people say things unscripted that they may or may not apologize for later in the day and i think the president rushed or had his lieutenants rush to the cameras and say, of course,
4:29 am
we understand that the economy is where it is. >> nicole? >> we were talking in the break about how when you are running for re-election and you have a campaign and you use the president as your messenger, it is really not a good idea to do it in the white house briefing room. if you want to use the president -- because the president running for re-election has to do both jobs. you're president but you're also trying to win an election. with all the same challenges and in this case more than he had four years ago. but you never send your candidate who's also the president into the white house briefing room to deliver a political message. so i think that's why they stepped in it. if you want him to deliver a political message have a rally in northern virginia, but you don't send your president who is the leader of a country in very difficult times and a very strained economy to the white house briefing room to deliver a political message. >> you just said he has to do both jobs, be the candidate and president. >> right. >> barack obama is not being the president right now. >> yeah. >> there is no presidential leadership that we see on
4:30 am
capitol hill. >> and you feel it, right? there's a lack of leadership. we're not able -- there is a lot of, despite the impression of washington, there actually is bipartisan agreement that some things have to get done. there are republicans and democrats who believe that tax reform should happen. you know, without presidential leadership, none of these things happen. >> senator, one of the arguments that the president put forward a a jobs bill and for the most part just laid there. >> the president is focused not on the whole economy but on a government-based economy. we need to get people back to work. he could put people back to work with the -- >> the jobs bill -- >> he had his checklist of do this and that. had to do with basically spending more money, raising taxes do it, and he could get jobs created immediately by approving the keystone pipeline. doesn't do it. the onerous regulations coming out of the epa are making it harder to get people back to work. so much uncertainty about the cost of the health care law, are
4:31 am
taxings going to go up, the fiscal cliff we're heading to, and yet harry reid the leader of the democrats in the senate started off briefing 40 members of the house to say, don't worry, our plan for the year, he said, is a new electoral strategy, forget passing bills, the democrats just want to play the blame game in 2012, put up bills that don't get voted on. >> harry reid, obviously, is trying to kill certain bills. mitch mcconnell -- >> nothing happening between now and november. >> so sad. >> mitch said his number one goal was to stop the president. this happens. unfortunately it happens on both sides. i want to ask you, though, about a longer trend, and that is the trend of president as campaigner in chief. we're seeing it here. i'm hearing a lot of democrats saying, several months ago, this president sort of threw in the towel on getting things done and he's running a political campaign. he's not the first president to do that. the bush -- under rove, the bush
4:32 am
administration was great in it. i remember in 1999, when re-election -- when we were moving towards election and seriously, i started reading greek and roman history. i knew -- i could do my job -- i knew i would be sitting on the floor hearing a lot of maneuvering but i could actually learn something the next couple years while i was stuck on the floor. it keeps getting worse, though. it's worse now than it's ever been and it's going to be worse whoever the next president is. >> not just between now and november. the kind of constantly pushing huge problems down the road, the denial of these problems, take the problem that we have that may be arguably the worst problem we have, not of an individual war, and god knows we have many of those with syria and all over the world, but the globe is heating up, the fact that scientists nearly unanimously if not unanimously agree on this trend, the fact that this will lead to the loss of millions and millions of jobs
4:33 am
and displace tens of millions of people on countntinents all ove the world, the ramifications of warming are clear and not 500 years from now but for our children and grandchildren and we defer this and defer this and defer this at our own peril. i don't see the senate or the house or the president or anyone of authority doing anything on this. this can is kicked down the road. this is indicative of so many problems we have. we have a crisis of power. >> and speaking of cans being kicked down the road, the president at the beginning of the road said he wasn't going to kick the debt can down the road, social security down the road, medicare down the road. if the president of the united states called you up today and said senator, i've decided i'm going to listen to my debt commission and ale going to go and put that back on the floor and i'm going to be a champion of it and i'm going to support it and not leave anybody hanging out in the wind, if the president asked you for his support a vote up or down for
4:34 am
that simpson-bowles commission, would you support it? >> i would want to have a debate on it. raising taxes on anybody right now isn't a great idea. bill clinton has just said that. larry summers said it. >> but what if democrats and republicans alike could say, we won't raise taxes for a couple years until the gdp goes up to 3 or 4. i mean, would you be willing to work with the president to pass simpson bowls under some circumstances? >> al simpson is from wyoming, in the senate before me and i visit with him quite frequently, i'll be at the rodeo with him on the fourth of july and i'll always listen to al. may not necessarily. >> irrelevant, irrelevant and irrelevant. would you -- >> i will work with the president. i don't know how i would vote on that depending on the debate, skutsion and the amendments. i'm not going to vote to raise taxes on anybody right now. but i would welcome presidential leadership on all of the things you just talked about. >> if republicans and democrats came together and let's say, for
4:35 am
instance, listen, i never voted for a tax increase in my life, never did, very proud of it, but i'll be first to say if democrats would come to the table with a plan to save medicare over the next generation, a plan to save social security over the next generation, a plan to cut defense spending over the next generation, a plan to get us out of decade-long occupations over the next generation, and they needed to reform the tax code to make it flatter and fairer, but it would increase more revenue -- bring more money into the federal government. >> get more people working. >> i would support that in a second. would you? >> absolutely. get more revenue by having more people working and the tax reform, i mean that's the way you raise revenue. you don't go after you and you. you raise overall revenue having more people working, more people paying taxes in a productive economy which we don't have right now at 8.2% unemployment and kids living back in their parents' basements because they can't find work. >> let me ask you this.
4:36 am
if we take care of long-term debt, take care of long-term debt, social security, take care of the long-term debt with medicare, take care of the long-term debt by reducing the scope of u.s. military spending globally, is it okay for us to spend more money on infrastructure? >> you have the money to spend that. >> is it okay to spend more money on r and d? >> more money on education. >> the revenue is coming in. >> you're in the caucus, you're in the scarborough republican caucus that says if china is investing in it we need to invest in it, but we need to beat their butts. >> and we need to quit borrowing money from china because we don't want to be indebted to them. we're borrowing $2 million every minute. >> we're doing this, ladies and gentlemen, head bows all eyes closed doing this one at a time. so we can do two things at once. we can take care of the long-term debt, while investing short-term in our economy, right, by rebuilding our
4:37 am
infrastructure, rebuilding our schools, investing in r and d, doing the sort of things we need to do to beat the chinese, beat the indians, to beat the saudis? we can do that as a nation, right? >> yeah. by raising overall revenue, getting more people back to work, getting rid of a lot of the regulations that are coming out of washington. >> taking care of the long-term debt? >> well that's what we need to focus on. you talk about the beatles earlier, 50 years ago today, the beatles started. 50 years ago this year, john kennedy in his state of the union said that persistently large deficits, he said, endanger our economic future. at the time, the deficit that year was $7 billion. >> yeah. >> the deficit this year was almost 200 times that number. we're only talking 50 years, the lifetime of the beatles. >> yeah, yeah, yeah. senator, thank you for being with us. >> george harrison, the tax man, wrote a song about this. >> coming up, bad habits may be hard to break but we have an author here who says it gets a lot easier if you understand the
4:38 am
science behind our bad habits. we'll talk about that when we come back on "morning joe." good morning! wow. want to start the day with something heart healthy and delicious? you're a talking bee... honey nut cheerios has whole grain oats that can help lower cholesterol. and it tastes good? sure does! right... ♪ wow. delicious, right? yeah. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... ♪ well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? be happy. be healthy.
4:39 am
how do you know which ones to follow? the equity summary score consolidates the ratings of up to 10 independent research providers into a single score that's weighted based on how accurate they've been in the past. i'm howard spielberg of fidelity investments. the equity summary score is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades today and explore your next investing idea. [ female announcer ] new aveeno skin strengthening body cream helps transform dry, thinning skin, by strengthening its moisture barrier, for improved texture and elasticity in 2 weeks. reveal healthy, supple skin. aveeno skin strengthening.
4:40 am
4:41 am
4:42 am
♪ welcome back to "morning joe." the summer olympics kicks off just 46 days from now, but i'll tell you what, our opening ceremony happens in just a minute! the mayor of london. i've waited so long. so long. boris johnson is here. he's going to talk about how his city is preparing for the big games. "morning joe" shall return. ♪ with the spark cash card from capital one,
4:43 am
sven's home security gets the most rewards of any small business credit card! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back
4:44 am
on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve the most rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. i never believed i'd be in control of my weight. [ whistles ] ♪ but here i am.
4:45 am
still in control. loving how i eat. loving just walking. not stressing at all about my weight. ♪ if you want it, you got it weight watchers made me believe i could do it. join for $1 and you will too. weight watchers. believe. because it works. welcome back to "morning joe." hey, hey, hey, over here. >> sorry, right here. >> right here. >> right here. >> i'm really excited. >> we're talking about sugary drinks. >> the american people are excited because with us now, the
4:46 am
man who got elected mayor promising his constituents if they voted for him, they would have more money in their pocket, bmw in their parking lot -- >> no, that's an exaggeration. >> wait. >> no. >> wives with larger breasts. boris johnson. >> falsely attributed to me. >> oh, please. >> sir, you said it and you know it. >> in the english press there was a false quotation? >> slightly souped up. >> where were you when you promised bmws and larger breasts to your constituents? >> that's the whole point, i can't remember. i don't exclude it. i don't exclude it may come true. i just didn't promise it. >> it could happen, it could come true. >> it could come true. i don't want to discourage anybody who voted on me on that basis. >> because you never know, you may need to run for re-election a third time and they still may be looking at their wife wondering, when your promises are going to come to fruition. you have a book too, called
4:47 am
"johnson's life of london, the people who made the city that made the world." you were born in new york. >> i was born in new york. i wanted to be close to my mother at the time and -- >> why? >> she was a student in new york. >> yeah. >> i was with my father. >> thank god you're not here now, you can't smoke, you can't drink, you can't drink sugary -- it's horrible. >> i was thinking about that. on the face it's crazy to tell people to try to restrict cup sizes or whatever -- not get back to -- >> no. >> the issue you mentioned earlier on. >> you're against the restriction of cup sizes. >> against the restriction of cup sizes, but we've got a problem. america has a problem, we've got a problem. we are not as fat as you yet, but i'm certainly fatter than mayor bloomberg. there's a crisis in obesity and we've got to look practically at what the solutions are. >> so you're just avowed -- avowed marxist or socialist.
4:48 am
you've beat him twice now. >> champagne socialist is the term. >> i thought we had a champagne socialist in france. would you call ken a champagne socialist? why? >> a shadow -- >> perhaps. >> by the way, you were very concerned that people are going to go to work with niall ferguson still in their head. >> i just want to try to ill lus straight the key issue, which is everybody thinks the only solution is to keep pushing money into greece and spain, create this fiscal union, try to turn europe into the united states of america, as niall was saying, where delaware bales out new mexico. >> exactly. >> the problem with that is that you can't annual guise the creation of the federal union of the united states with the creation of a european fiscal union. very different countries, different languages, different political traditions.
4:49 am
you're asking the germans to keep paying forever for the periphery and you're asking the periphery to accept unending humiliation of loss of political control, loss of democratic accountability for their finances. >> like margaret thatcher, you've been a skeptic for a long time. >> i have been a skeptic. >> are we -- >> what's the solution some. >> i'm afraid the solution -- >> i want to know if we have the thatcher statutes going up all over london right now because of what she did in '88, '89, '90 when being kicked around. margaret thatcher was a prophet, was she not? >> i think she was certainly right about this issue. there is a statute of her in the house of commons. whether i would get away with installing equestrian statutes -- >> i want more. >> equestrian statutes. >> yes, i do. her carrying a huge -- >> would say get back to the book. margaret thatcher doesn't appear in this book, but she certainly is one of those londoners who changed the world. >> okay. >> but what's the solution?
4:50 am
>> the solution is, there's a grim german proverb which says -- >> are there any other kind? >> no. this is a typicallyproverb -- >> are there any other kind? >> no, but it says better an end without horror than horror without end. i don't think president obama's political fortunes, anybody's political fortunes are going to recover until there's certainty, until everybody knows that -- until his balloon basically burst one way or the other. i think if they had some leadership, you could contrive an orderly solution to the eurozone problem. you could order a bisection into the north euro a south euro, you could do something like that. what you can't do is shoehorn these countries into a political union, which they're not ready. it's a terrible idea. you're making a bad problem worse at the moment.
4:51 am
>> i heard someone say that you can't share a currency with countries that nap in the middle of the day. >> you don't want to be rude. it's cruel and unfair to ask the greek economy to compete toe to toe in a single zone with very, very productive german economy. that's the problem. look at what's happened to the italian car industry. they're being massacred by this. >> we never think about the other side of it, which when you said the humiliation of receiving funds, losing political -- we never, i think, think about that side of it. we think about the countries that are paying. that's what we hear, see and talk about more. because there probably is psychological turmoil and angst of being bailed out. >> but they can get past that by working harder. if i'm germany, why do i keep
4:52 am
wanting to bail out the greeks who still -- they won't make tough choices when it comes to taxation, they won't make tough choices when it comes to working. the french? they lowered their retirement age to 60! who does that in 2012? >> i agree. in an ideal world, they would all miraculously come tutonic in their habits, savings and work ethic and everything else. unfortunately that won't happen any time soon. in the meantime, there's that political reaction to being told by berlin what you have to do with your spending. and people are going to lose their jobs because angela merkel says so. in the end, that's politically toxic. >> people don't like being told by berlin what to do, less than you might think. >> there's a nasty history behind that. if you're sitting at home in middle america now and you have your nascar jersey on and you
4:53 am
stumble, happen to stumble to london, get this book. this book, i will tell you, will save you during the owe lilympo. "johnson's life of london." you're a music fan. the beatles, stones, shakespeare -- >> they're all there. it's a hymn of celebration for some of the problematic geniuses, people who exported gravy. one of the arguments i make is rock 'n roll was basically reexported by london in the '60s to america. >> 1964, baby. that's right. changed everything. very excited about you deciding to run the marathon. you're going to -- >> wait, that's a wager i have not yet made. >> okay. >> i'm wily not to make it on the show. >> i will tell you what, take care of the breasts, we'll give
4:54 am
you a pass on the marathon. thank you so much. we appreciate it. "johnson's life of london." buy the book. it will change your life. coming up next, we will talk to the producer of clyborn park. jordan roth joins us on set. you are watching "morning joe." i want healthy skin for life.
4:55 am
[ female announcer ] improve the health of your skin with aveeno daily moisturizing lotion. the natural oatmeal formula improves skin's health in one day, with significant improvement in 2 weeks. i found a moisturizer for life. [ female announcer ] only from aveeno. our cloud is made of bedrock. concrete. and steel. our cloud is the smartest brains combating the latest security threats.
4:56 am
it spans oceans, stretches continents. and is scalable as far as the mind can see. our cloud is the cloud other clouds look up to. welcome to the uppernet. high schools in six states enrolled in the national math and science initiative... ...which helped students and teachers get better results in ap courses. together, they raised ap test scores 138%. just imagine our potential... ...if the other states joined them. let's raise our scores. let's invest in our teachers and inspire our students. let's solve this.
4:57 am
4:58 am
♪ ♪ surf's up everybody get your boards and your wetsuits ♪
4:59 am
free-credit-score-dot-com's gonna direct you ♪ ♪ to check your credit score before it gets too late ♪ ♪ and you end up strapped for cash ♪ ♪ patching your board with duct tape ♪ ♪ so hit free-credit-score-dot-com ♪ ♪ find out what credit's about ♪ ♪ or else you could be headed for a credit wipeout ♪ offer applies with enrollment in freecreditscore.com™.
5:00 am
an accident doesn't have to slow you down. with better car replacement available only with liberty mutual auto insurance, if your car's totaled, we give you the money for a car one model year newer. to learn more, visit us today. responsibility. what's your policy?
5:01 am
5:02 am
♪ >> there's been tremendous turmoil in our financial markets and wall street. and it's -- people are frightened by these events. our economy, still the fundamentals of our economy are strong. >> the truth of the matter is, as i said, we created 4.3 million jobs over the past 27 months. over 800,000 just this year alone. the private sector is doing fine. >> good morning. it's 8:00 a.m. on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast as you take a live look at new york city. back with us on set, mark ha halperin, nicolle wallace. you were trying to tamp down all the screaming when it was said
5:03 am
the economy is strong. when i first heard the clip this weekend of the president, i just gasped. >> i did, too. >> it took me straight back to september 15, 2008, what makes politicians say such things? >> well, the truth is they are out of touch because of the nature of the jobs they have. and i think that this moment reminded me more of john kerry's gaffe when he said i voted for it before i voted against it. in 2004 they were talking about funding for the troops. it's one of those things where it doesn't matter what the romney campaign says about it. it doesn't matter what obama does to clean it up. he went out with a foreign leader and tried to clean it up a few hours later. it's one of those moments that has no ability to be shaped or spun orplained
5:04 am
away. it leaves an impression that cements into the minds of everyone on the right and far too many in the middle -- >> and too ma many people looki for work. >> correct it seals in the narrative that he has no clue when it comes to creating jobs in the private sector. >> mark, when you look at that clip, you knew they would have to clean up after it but that's a devastating clip, again because of the way he delivered it. he wasn't reading off of notes. he believed it. he believed the private sector is doing fine. >> i'm a minority view on this i think all of this is silly. i think when mccain said the fundamentals of the economy are strong was silly. john mccain was making a point that's perfectly valid, so was the president. i just think this is what our politics has become. it's hard for me to swim upstream against it, because
5:05 am
everything nicolle said it right. >> look at the polls pre-september 15th. before john mccain said what he said, john mccain and sarah palin were on a march, ahead of president obam barack obama and doing well. >> it's true it has that effect but it shouldn't. >> well, danflowers shouldn't b under snow in january but they are. it showed collapse, didn't it? >> it was cemented into peoples minds that he was feeling his way around the financial crisis with as much consternation and confusion as they were. that's not what people want. people want someone who can come into office and fix things. they want someone who knowses more about the problems that alarm and frighten them than they do.
5:06 am
the problem with obama's comment people already suspected he didn't understand the problems and the strain on families when the private sector doesn't thrive. he's so demonized the private sector he almost can't dig himself out of that. >> of course he understands. >> no, he doesn't -- hold on a second. you think he understands the private sector? you need to talk to people who run the private sector. 99 out of 100 that you talk to that run private sector don't think he understands the private sector. >> that's not what nicolle said. he was asked if he understood the struggles of the people in the current economy. >> let's talk about the difference between the private sector and the public sector. there's long been a belief that this president is obsessed over public sector jobs, but he doesn't really understand how the private sector works. you've heard that right? >> sure i've heard that.
5:07 am
of course i've heard that, many businessmen say that. the question if he understand house the private sector works or not is a legitimate question. this morning we are talking about political statements that seem inopportune. when john mccain said that, it was followed by one of the greatest collapses in financial history and one of the greatest job declines in history. when the president said it, i don't know if it was a slip of the tongue or if he generally believes the private sector is fine. there have been 4.4 million jobs created since the jobs recession. corporate sector profits are doing fine. i don't know which of those he got mixed up in his own mind. i think he certainly understands that there are still almost 5 million americans who had work
5:08 am
when the recession began who don't have work now. >> let me ask you this, do you think the private sector is doing fine? >> it depends on what you mean doing fine. private sector profits are at record levels. they went through the -- >> but those are those rich people that the president doesn't like. >> i'm parsing it for you. when it comes to jobs -- >> let's look at the private sector that the president is talking about. if you told him that the corporations were making lots of money, that would not be doing fine by this president's definition. >> so if you look at it in terms of jobs, since the beginning of the recession, there have been close to 5 million jobs lost in the private sector. i think you have a hard time saying the private sector is doing fine. people always talk about jobs. it's a like to remind them, there's also incomes, peoples incomes are also down in the private sector over this time. even the 90% of americans who have jobs have lower incomes on average. >> okay. that's not -- so that wouldn't
5:09 am
be, like -- fine? >> fine? >> it's not super fine. >> i'm saying it's not doing fine. >> nicolle, back to you. there are moments throughout history where a president will say something on air that will be so wildly out of touch that people will pull their hair out. the first thing i can remember is watching gerald ford in a 1976 debate with jimmy carter. here i was in '76, i was 13 years old. and i heard gerald ford say there was no soviet influence in poland. you know, i put down my nerf darts and said no! he was given the opportunity to clean it up again. no! it was so blatantly obvious. then we have the president saying the private sector is fine. but this happens from time to time. like, what was the key when
5:10 am
george w. bush would say something like this, or jeb or john mccain? what's the key for this white house? >> it's always a reminder for a president of the power and the magnification of the office of the presidency. george w. bush spent his entire presidency, you can look at it before and after the speech where he stood in front of a banner that said mission accomplished. there are things that you can say, images that you can present that are indelible. that is either commented in the mind, a narrative that people had already been worried about or that are such big blunders, i would put obama's comment in the blunder category. that you don't recover from them. you have to move on. this is one that the obama campaign will move on from. as mark said, the media cycle is so accelerated, there's so much gunk in the system now there will be a gazillion more stories between now and election day
5:11 am
that they have to deal with. this is devastating in that not that he thinks the private sector is doing fine, but that he doesn't understand that the health of the private sector is tied to the economic pain that many american families feel. he thinks those people are doing fine over there, and he doesn't worry about them. what the debate will be in this election is that the health, the prosperity, the ability to flourish in the private sector is directly linked to our ability to add jobs, to the income of middle class families, to the way people feel about this economy. we have a president who is not only really against the private sector but doesn't seem to understand the connection. >> i wouldn't go that far. i think, as i said, he looked at some jobs numbers that show it getting better. i think he misspoke. he corrected himself, unlike gerald ford in that debate, which i also remember. and i agree that this is a moment and we'll move on. it won't be one of those
5:12 am
defining moments of the campaign. it's one of those bad choice of words that he will get -- i think once we get done this program, he will get himself past. >> one thing about this that sickened me. the president said this, his team said we have to fight back. find a way to change the story. so the president comes out, in addition governor romney later in the day said how we don't need more teachers, firefighters, police. rather than sort of calling a truce and saying, well, people say things they shouldn't say, the president did this morning and now governor romney has, they jumped on that. these are two serious guys running for president. the dynamics of friday into the weekend and into this morning is this is a campaign about twitter and web videos. >> there's one difference, governor romney has endorsed a budget that would have fewer police, firefighters and teachers. that is his policy. >> right. that's a position that many people in the country think is the right thing to do at this
5:13 am
time when we have huge deficits. that's the point he was making. to then accuse him of not liking firefighters, police and teachers -- >> he's not for cutting firefighters or teachers. we had this debate after the stimulus, the 2010 midterm election showed that a lot of people in this country have concern when the only part of the economy that democrats wanted to help is the public sector job growth. i think governor romney is on solid ground saying that it can't be out of whack. we can't keep continuing to add infinite numbers firefighters and teachers. >> all i'm saying is the ryan budget would provide for substantial reductions to aid to localities, which would translate into less firefighters and -- >> romney was simply saying that these are not the only kinds of jobs we should be adding. >> let me ask you this question. is "usa today," is that still
5:14 am
the most read newspaper in america? >> it's the most widely circulated. >> most widely circulated. probably good reason for it, we talk about spain, euro -- >> not there. >> no. instead -- there's a pie chart that says four out of five americans don't want to talk about spain. >> can you blame them? >> no, i don't. they're not talking about all this stuff. they're talking about -- this is "usa today," i love them for it, look at that. the beatles turn 50. 1962, we are all beatle maniacs, the beatles went in started recording in '62, 50 years ago this last friday. >> you know they're not an american band, right? >> i didn't know that. they recorded their first song,
5:15 am
which was? the first hit? >> "i want to hold your hand." >> look at you. 50 years into it. you were old enough to remember them. i was not. you saw them on ed sullivan? >> i saw them on ed sullivan. i didn't go to shea stadium, but i remember them going to shaea stadium. >> were you old enough to remember? >> sadly, no. but i saw the kinoscopes. >> more to the point, it is the 40th anniversary of the watergate break-in. >> today is? >> i think it was over the weekend. woodward and bernstein on face the nation giving a joint interview for the first time. >> we can't have a beatles reunion, but we can have a woodward and bernstein reunion. >> let's go ahead and talk about
5:16 am
spain quickly. you know, steve, you were worried about what would be happening over the next couple of weeks. do they avoid the meltdown that could be devastating to this country? >> this is like the little boy who put his finger in the dam, the hoover dam, and it has managed to keep the dam from breaking and cascading. this is what they had to do at the least possible moment. spain was resisting any kind of a bailout. they didn't want to be lumped in with portugal and greece, spain. but in the end they took one. they are trying to convince the world it's only for the banks. the rest of spain is doing fine. they will save their banks and solve their problem. but the ongoing cascade, like the game whack-a-mole, you whack
5:17 am
one down and three more pop up somewhere else will keep happening because they are not dealing with their fundamental problems. the the markets will be up today. we'll have a respite from this and something else will happen. >> mark, last night of course, you were home eating your bon bones in your robe watching the tony's. >> i was. >> we saw the big winners last night. >> i seen "once" it's excellent. they won lots. they won eight tony's. based on the movie. >> steve, you go a good bit? >> i try to i saw "death of a salesman." maybe not as often as mark. >> they played mike nichols off. that was weird. he was in the middle of his speech and they cut him off. i don't think do you that to mike nichols. >> "clybourne park". >> pulitzer and now a tony. >> best play, our friend will be
5:18 am
coming, jordan roth. maybe he can get us some tickets to it. >> can you stay up that late? >> i can now. i've turned over a new leaf. >> what happening? >> what that means is that you -- you keep waking up at -- >> earlier and earlier. >> 4:00 a.m., at some point after about five years of it, you realize that you haven't done anything after 7:00 at night. and that it's time to start having a life. >> kind of like having a newborn. >> yeah. except you have to wake up at 3:30 every morning. >> i was up at 3:30. >> for five years? >> six months. >> if that thing is still getting you up at 3:30 five years from now, come talk to me. you got a situation. you need baby ambien. coming up next, the power of habit. we will be talking be the best selling book on whether we have the power to change human
5:19 am
nature. and how markets are reacting to the spain bank bailout. and broadway's big night at the tony's. first, here is bill karins. >> we have been talking about the fires out west and they continue to burn. one outside of fort collins has damaged 18 homes and is out of control. look at that house there. that doesn't exist anymore. not going to see wet weather out there any time soon. don't expect the fire season to get better. the eastern half of the country, very wet. very humid. western portion of the country, very warm and very dry. we had record rains in mobile and pensacola. those are the rainfall totals on your screen. nearly a foot of rain between the two locations. looking at wet, humid weather
5:20 am
from kentucky up to ohio. thunderstorms around kansas city. interstate 70 is not a fun ride. that's your travel trouble spot, interstate 70 through missouri. eastern portion of the country, humid, on and off showers and storms that will arrive in new york city and d.c. not today but tuesday. a beautiful day out in san francisco, 84 and sunny. enjoy it while it lasts. nice shot in seattle. you enjoyed some dry weather. it won't last long, showers tomorrow. you are watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. [ jennifer ] i always knew my voice would take me places.
5:21 am
i never believed i'd be in control of my weight. [ whistles ] ♪ but here i am. still in control. loving how i eat. loving just walking. not stressing at all about my weight. ♪ if you want it, you got it weight watchers made me believe i could do it. join for $1 and you will too. weight watchers. believe. because it works.
5:22 am
in here, great food demands a great presentation. so at&t showed corporate caterers how to better collaborate by using a mobile solution, in a whole new way. using real-time photo sharing abilities, they can create and maintain high standards, from kitchen to table. this technology allows us to collaborate with our drivers to make a better experience for our customers. [ male announcer ] it's a network of possibilities -- helping you do what you do... even better. ♪
5:23 am
5:24 am
welcome back to "morning joe." we'll talk about this in a second. here we have with us, listen, children, the "new york times," i love the "new york times." charles duhigg, the author of the new book, "the power of habit: why we do what we do in life and business." what were you saying about the times? >> i feel it around the newsroom, this is one of the stops everyone is happy to make. we feel like it's a great show. >> you know why you're happy to make it here? i'm happy to have you. you know why? i always say the "new york times" is my favorite newspaper. >> it's my favorite also.
5:25 am
>> is whether say it's the one i have to read. people come on and say that was a great article and we talk about it. we've been doing that for five years. >> you are correct. >> we should get you a cut of the new subscriptions. >> i criticized a romney story on friday -- >> the house. rightfully so. >> it goes back to the ricketts article, '08 and the eisner story. when i criticize an article, i never criticize the reporters. it's always a question of where the editor will put something. every story is a legitimate story. you have a couple of responsibilities if you want to be the paper of record. one is you want to make sure it's proper placement. the ricketts story shouldn't have been need, but maybe in the
5:26 am
political notebook. same thing with the romney wealth, all that. any way, so they start, like, sending statements out, are tweeting. i get called. somebody asked me, i said considering that we have 30 positive "new york times" mentions to every one negative mention, they're sounding kind of like those thin-skinned politicians -- >> no, we have much thinner skin. >> reporters do? >> i plead guilty. journalists have much thinner skin than politicians. i have to give credit to politicians. i don't know how they live day-to-day. i have lots of problems with politicians, but -- >> so i can praise the "new york times" and the new yorker forever, but if i'm critical of one or two pieces -- >> i will be a puddle on the floor. >> you glance at me wrong, i'll bruise. >> so, now that we got that clear, this is another example
5:27 am
of how we love the "new york times." i had you on before, i read through "the power of habit." and i invite you on. i'm thinking, the guy is all right, he can teach me something. >> all of us. >> "the power of habit." consistency. so i invite charles, you know what he does? stands me up. he doesn't show up. mr. "the power of habit." >> apparently the lesson did not take hold. >> or it is to stand people up to help sell books. let's go into this. there are so many things that -- i'm extraordinarily disciplined. i will say in 99% of my life. for instance, eating right. i just, you know what? i'm going to eat the brownie on sunday, drink the sweet tea, do whatever. how do we hardwire -- rewire ourselves to have the right kind of habits? >> so in the last decade we lived through this amazing time
5:28 am
when it comes to understanding the neurology of habits and neurology in general. one thing scientists have learned is that every habit has three components. a queue, like a trigger for the behavior to start. the behavior itself and then the reward. the reward, how the particular part of the brain, learns to encode this -- >> so you have the queue, what's next? >> the routine, and then the reward. most of the time we think about the routine. but what we've learned it's the queue and reward that are enormously impactful. >> what's the queue for eating brownies? i would say i have this 1% also going wrong. >> let's talk about bad habits first. the brownie. what's my queue for having the brownie. >> probably seeing the brownie. >> i had a tough day. >> you've had a tough day. you're having an emotional depletion. low willpower. >> i live in new york. i could be really happy, if i
5:29 am
see a brownie, it's the same. >> your brain will start experiencing the neurological reward associated with that brownie as soon as you see it. so it's much easier to pick it up and take a bite. >> so the routine is eating it. and then the reward --. >> the sugar of the brownie, the taste or it or the burst of energy you get. perhaps you associate things with brownies that you like. >> let's talk about some other bad habits. let's move on to cigarette smoking or drinking abusively. >> right. >> what is the queue for that? >> so the queue usually for cigarette smoking is a certain time of day. the reward is that nicotine is actually kind of fun. it gives you a burst of energy. studies in the last couple of years have shown the best way to stop smoking is to replace cigarettes with coffee, something that gives you the stimulation. what is interesting, the same science is not just your personal habits, it's being used now in electoral campaigns.
5:30 am
one of the biggest experiments going on now, every campaign rung these limited experiments to try to figure out how do i trigger voting habits? how do you get people to show up and get them to the polls? the same way, queues and rewards. >> so what type of queues? >> the number one queue you can do is tell someone if they voted before. if you call them up and say to them we notice you voted two years ago, are you going to vote this time? or if you call them up and say are you going to vote this time? 70% more likelihood they'll end up voting if you reminded them they voted before. you are creating a self-image queue. as the reward? you have to give people something when they vote. which is why social media is so important. come november, will you see peoples facebook pages light up with obama postings on their facebook page that says so and so just voted. they are trying to create this
5:31 am
reward. >> how do we turn things around and nicolle was talking about the brownie versus the fruit. seriously, exercising versus staying on the couch. i come home from work, i'm exhausted, i plop in the chair, i turn on the news. do i just -- do i not go through the front door? is that how i break the habit? do i say i'm not walking in the front door until i exercise for an hour? how do we do it? what do we do? >> you need to have an obvious queue. put your running shoes, plan ahead of time. there's a psychologist who has this thing called implementation intentions it says you have to choose a queue ahead of time. when you exercise, you have to give yourself a reward. >> the brownie. >> the brownie, or this big experiment was done in germany where they gave some people a small piece of chocolate after they went running which is counter intuitive. the whole people exercise is to lose weight. at first your brain does not believe you like running.
5:32 am
in fact, your body doesn't believe you like running. if you give yourself a small piece of chocolate, you start this neurological process that makes it easier to go running, because you associate it. >> it's pavlovian. >> exactly. it's a little bit more sophisticated. >> that great scene in "body hurt" when he runs for five miles and lights up a cigarette. >> there's your reward. >> that might be it. >> any questions about habits, guys? >> i'm afraid i will, as i always do, take this very smart advice, buy a kit-kat and put it on the treadmill. >> what does that say across america, any gym i work out, half the tvs, while people are chugging alone -- >> food network. >> they're all watching food network. a molten chocolate cake while the calorie count is ticking up and it will never reach the number of one piece of molten
5:33 am
chocolate cake. >> i think that's the same thing, we're basically associating these behaviors almost intuitively with these rewards. in organizational habits, when alcoa was taken over. he made it into one of the most profitable companies in the world. he felt he could transform the culture. the number one thing he did when he came in, if you had a full day without an injury which is like a big deal. nobody gets hurt. that's reward in and of itself. he would send people a handwritten note that says, good job, paul. i don't know why getting a handwritten note -- >> good job for not getting hurt? >> keeping your arm, not getting injured. >> somebody noticed. >> this matters. for some reason, watching a tv show about cakes matters more than actually how you feel after you have gone running, getting a note from the ceo matters more than keeping all your fingers.
5:34 am
our brain has a weird way of assigning value but it works. >> thanks for coming in, charles. the book is "the power of habit: why we do what we do in life and business." i will keep plowing through. great to see you. >> take care. coming up next, jordan roth, one of the producers for "clybourne park," a big winner at last night's tony awards. more "morning joe" in just a minute. now you can apply sunblock to your kids' wet skin. neutrogena® wet skin kids. ordinary sunblock drips and whitens. neutrogena® wet skin cuts through water. forms a broad spectrum barrier for full strength sun protection. wet skin. neutrogena®. ♪ ♪
5:35 am
♪ ♪ thor's couture gets the most rewards of any small business credit card. your boa! [ garth ] thor's small business earns double miles on every purchase, every day! ahh, the new fabrics, put it on my spark card. [ garth ] why settle for less? the spiked heels are working. wait! [ garth ] great businesses deserve the most rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with double miles or 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? [ cheers and applause ]
5:36 am
5:37 am
5:38 am
♪ >> there are those rare people who can look at the world and see things the rest of us don't see until they show us, these are the writers. there are the special few who can take that vision and turn it back into the world, these are the directors, the designers. there are fearless beings who can live in that world and show white house we are. these are our actors. then there are the people who set forward and say show me this world, open me, change me, these are our audiences. when all of these people come together and say yes, there is theater. we say thank you to every one who says yes.
5:39 am
>> i think we have to clap there. that was wonderful. that was producer jordan roth and playwrite bruce norris also there accepting best play award for "clybourne park." 66th annual tony awards. jordan joins us now what a remarkable night. what a remarkable speech. >> thank you. >> most remarkably, you have a trophy that spins. >> there it is. >> look at that. huh! >> let's see an oscar do that. >> is it supposed to do that? >> absolutely. our son woke up this morning, saw this, and said congratulations on your spinning trophy. >> this is not like one of these awards that they just sort of spit out. this was a -- this was a highly -- you won in probably the most highly competitive category.
5:40 am
what does it mean to you? >> you know, it means that it's a remarkable time on broadway when we have categories at the tony awards that are competitive it means so many shows are exceptional and exciting and are connecting with audiences. this is a great thing. it's a great time to be an audience member. that's what i am first. >> it tackles tough subjects. >> we dig in. we dig in at "clybourne park." you know, our country was founded on a promise that almost from the very moment we made it it has been a challenge to keep it. so much so we don't even have the words anymore to talk about it. that's why there's theater. we come to the theater to watch people on stage who are not us grappling, fighting, loving,
5:41 am
that's safe because it's them up there, it's not me, until at some point through the night, when i get home, maybe weeks later, they bury in me. now i understand. now i understand me. now i have the words to talk about it. that's why we come to the theater. >> david, there seemed a time when the theater was filled with guys in masks and, like, roller blades. >> there's still some -- >> that guy in the mask is still there. >> i know. the mask won't stop. but it seems to me that broadway has just gone to a completely didn't level. >> i think if you pick your spots, it can be extraordinary. i went to see "death of a salesman" and that play to read it and think about it sometimes seems old-fashioned and dated. yet in the hands of mike nichols
5:42 am
and the actors he put forward it was reborn. >> truly. >> that play wreaked of high school readings for me until i saw it in his hands. >> that's what a great piece of writing can do, it can be timeless. >> your speech was so exquisite. >> thank you. >> i wonder if you find the theater of plays where there's more people like you that are that humble and see yourselves as part of something so much bigger. you're part of a theater community. how do you contrast that with the rest of the entertainment picture which unfortunately americans are exposed to the rest of the entertainment world. when they come to new york, most people try to get to broad kawa. but your speech stood out to me as something you don't see that often coming from the highest
5:43 am
levels of entertainment. how do you see theater compared to television and film. >> you know, anybody that pursues a life in storytelling does so because at some point they were told a story, they sat in a theater, they watched a movie, they were changed. and i think that's where it begins. whether you pursue life in the theater or pursue life in television or pursue life in movies, it's because you have something to say about the world. you have found a home in storytelling. >> how do you keep it that, though? you watch other facets of the entertainment industry, it seems to have gone to, you know, how much you get paid, movie deals. and the theater just seems pure still. >> i love you for saying that. the theater is pure. the theater is a place where people come to laugh and love
5:44 am
and think what i love about it is that it's communal. you are on stage. i'm in the audience. other people are around me. and at some point these people, we've all walked in as strangers, we form a community. we are having shared experience. and there's nothing like that. >> nothing. >> there's nothing like that. >> so when you go home, are you going to put that -- it's going to be like one of these "oceans 12" things where it's in a vault, lasers protecting it or will you throw it on your son's shelf? >> no, this doesn't get thrown anywhere it will be on my desk with love. >> with love. fantastic. can you spin it? t.j. wants you to spin it one more time. >> you go, t.j.. >> congratulations. >> congratulations.
5:45 am
how exciting. we're so glad you came to share it with us. >> thank you, joe. coming up next, how will the markets react to the spain bank bailouts and the spinning award? [ thunk ] sweet! [ male announcer ] the solid thunk of the door on the jetta. thanks, mister! [ meow ] [ male announcer ] another example of volkswagen quality. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease the 2012 jetta for $159 a month.
5:46 am
visit vwdealer.com today. right now lease the 2012 jetta for $159 a month. havi ng ait vwdealer.com today. n irregular heartbeat 2012 jetta for $159 a month. havputs you at 5 times calgreater risk of stroke. don't wait. go to afibstroke.com for a free discussion guide to help you talk to your doctor about reducing your risk. that's afibstroke.com.
5:47 am
wanted to provide better employee benefits while balancing the company's bottom line, their very first word was... [ to the tune of "lullaby and good night" ] ♪ af-lac ♪ aflac [ male announcer ] find out more at... [ duck ] aflac! [ male announcer ] ...forbusiness.com. [ yawning sound ] i knew it'd be tough on our retirement savings, especially in this economy. but with three kids, being home more really helped. man: so we went to fidelity. we talked about where we were and what we could do. we changed our plan and did something about our economy. now we know where to go for help if things change again. call or come in today to take control of your personal economy.
5:48 am
get free one-on-one help from america's retirement leader. welcome back. my gosh. have you seen "book of mormon" yet? >> i can't say it. blank frog. >> you just said it. >> i said blank. i laughed for a month. >> jordan is also involved in "book of mormon." unbelievable. let's check business before the bell with the man who won the tony last year, cnbc's brian sullivan live at cnbc global headquarters. you didn't bring your tony, did
5:49 am
you? >> yeah. he's actually outside. he's hanging around. we'll watch some soccer later today, me and tony. that's about the only tony i know. >> very good. what are you working on now? >> this spailout, that's what they're calling it. spain is going hat in hand, yeah, we need a bailout for our banking system. $125 billion. the markets are up today on that. european markets up. futures up. here's the problem, don't know if you can see my tie -- >> i was going to say, the markets have noted a nexus between what's happening in the world economy and your tie. tell us about it. >> because there's a little guy on this tie that is kicking a can. >> yeah. >> down the road. >> surrounded by euros and dollars. probably hard to see unless you have an 80-inch flat panel high def like mika has in house. we're talking about adding more debt to spain. yes, it's good news in the short term, but is the problem for
5:50 am
debt more debt? you're talking about adding more debt. here's the bottom line. the big issue for europe, this is a nice story it will help us today and for the next few days. it's a nice story. the big issue is sunday. greek elections that will determine the fate of all of europe. that's what you need to watch. we have six days. i'm not going to sleep until then. me and tony will stay up all night drinking red bull and watching spike tv. >> and watching rerunning of "morning joe" that i dvr'd over the years. >> and watching euro 2012. >> that is true. croatia looked very tough. >> croatia looked tough against ireland. my gosh. great, great match between italy and spain. >> and the spanish president was at the game when they were announcing the bailout. they're asking for the bailout and he's at the game. i love europe. >> today france and europe. it's going to be amazing. france and england. i'm very tired.
5:51 am
france and england today, europe takes a long nap from history. >> root for england or you're a socialist. >> what if i root for france? what does that make me? >> french. >> a guy that eats brownies. >> brian sullivan, thank you very much. tomorrow morning, "morning joe" will be live from chicago, talking about whether england or france won. we're back in a moment. [ male announcer ] knowing your customers is important to any successful business. which is why at wells fargo, we work with you to get to know the unique aspects
5:52 am
of your business. we can recommend financial solutions that can work for you that have helped millions of business owners save time, reduce expenses, and maximize cash flow. as the number one small business lender for nine years running... we're with you when you need us. so you can be there for your customers. wells fargo. together we'll go far.
5:53 am
wells fargo. an accident doesn't have to slow you down. with better car replacement, if your car is totaled, we give you the money for a car one model year newer. liberty mutual auto insurance.
5:54 am
5:55 am
tomorrow in the windy city. huge, huge show. we have warren buffett, also mayor rahm emanuel, he will be with us in chicago to talk about how the economy could impact the presidential election. also what goldman sachs is doing to help put small businesses back to work. and also we will have former white house chief of staff, bill daley co daley. coming up next what, if anything, did we learn? ♪ how are things on the west coast? ♪
5:56 am
♪ i hear you... ♪ rocky mountain high ♪ rocky, rocky mountain high ♪ ♪ all my exes live in texas ♪ ♪ born on the bayou [ female announcer ] the perfect song for everywhere can be downloaded almost anywhere. ♪ i'm back, back in the new york groove ♪ [ male announcer ] the nation's largest 4g network. covering 2,000 more 4g cities and towns than verizon. rethink possible.
5:57 am
5:58 am
what if i can't lose the weight? what if weight watchers can't help me? what if i'm not ready for change? what if i fall back into old habits? what if i lose control? what if i gain it all back? what if there's always an excuse why i can't? what if i can't follow through? what if i fail? shhh. there's only one voice worth listening to and that's the one saying you can do this. i'm standing here still in control of my weight with weight watchers, telling you to believe in that voice. join for $1. weight watchers. believe. because it works. ...more talk on social security... ...but washington isn't talking to the american people. [ female announcer ] when it comes to the future of medicare and social security, you've earned the right to know. ♪ ...so what does it mean for you and your family? [ female announcer ] you've earned the facts. ♪ washington may not like straight talk, but i do.
5:59 am
[ female announcer ] and you've earned a say. get the facts and make your voice heard on medicare and social security at earnedasay.org. welcome back to "morning joe." thank you very much for being with us today. time to talk about what we learned today. david what have you learned? >> i learned you should eat fruit and not brownies, but i don't know why. >> really? i learned from you actually -- i hope mika is listening in the south of france. there's nothing better do after a long five-mile run than light up a cigarette. >> very relaxing. refreshing. >> you guys are making fun, but what he really said is after a run you're supposed to eat chocolate, which i never knew. >> can you do that now?

149 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on